Djemaa el Fna, the city square of Marrakech
info
×
This series of photos is a sampling of Moroccan life and hardships. In Marrakech, the locals make Saturday night an affordable feast in Djemaa el Fna; in Casablanca congregants flock to one of the world's largest mosques for evening prayers. In the souks of the inner city of Marrakech, poverty and strife become apparent. And as one travels toward the desert to Tagounite, children are in desperate need of healthcare and hygienic aid. The nomads of the Sahara mainly choose to live freely in the desert, but often lack the resources needed to ensure safety, education, and wellness.

After a desert-trekking tour of the Sahara in 2007, Lisa Delsante coordinated an effort to enlist myself, another trekker (Victoria Monchuk, from the World Bank in Washington DC), and the touring company founder (Liz Williams, from Authentic Morocco in London) to form a new NGO, Children of the Sahara Foundation. We became an official 501(c)(3) non-profit organization in mid-2008.

The four of us met in Morocco on an information-gathering trip in October 2008. With the assistance of local guides Khalid Benhaddadi and Abdoullah Bassou, we made appointments with various agencies. In the capital city of Rabat we visited with the High Atlas Foundation, the Cross-Cultural Institute, David Brownstein at the US Embassy, and the Moroccan Peace Corps (M'hamed El Kadi and Mohssine Tadlaoui-Cherki) to define our strategies and mission.

In the past eight years we have supported schools and missions to the desert regions and outlying areas. Our current project as of 2016 is in funding the Hannan School in the Berber village of El Borj located in the Middle Atlas Mountains.

Snake charmers in Djemaa el Fna in Marrakech have assistants who collect money from lookers-on.

info
×
Using Format